Women’s Health

Is my urinary incontinence caused by giving birth vaginally?

DEAR DOCTOR K: I've had urinary incontinence ever since I gave birth last year. Why?

DEAR READER: Many women who give birth vaginally go on to develop loss of bladder control. This is called urinary incontinence. Childbirth can cause two types of incontinence. If urine leaks out when you jump, cough or laugh, or during any activity that puts pressure on your bladder, you have stress incontinence. You have urge incontinence (overactive bladder) if you feel a strong, overwhelming urge to urinate, even when your bladder isn't full. You probably also release some urine before you make it to the bathroom.

Is there a drug-free way to relieve PMS symptoms?

DEAR DOCTOR K: Every month I have awful PMS. Can you suggest drug-free ways to relieve my symptoms?

DEAR READER: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a collection of symptoms that occur just before and during menstruation. The most common symptom is unusual mood swings. In addition, women with PMS also experience irritability, anxiety, depression, headaches, hot flashes, bloating, abdominal cramping, breast tenderness and food cravings.

Do you suggest HPV testing or Pap smears for cervical cancer screenings?

DEAR DOCTOR K: I am 31 years old and have always had normal Pap smears. I just read that HPV testing might be better. What do you suggest?

DEAR READER: Screening for cervical cancer has led to a dramatic decrease in the disease. Until fairly recently, all cervical cancer screening was done by Pap smear. But the FDA recently approved the use of a new screening tool -- the HPV DNA test -- that may eventually take its place.

Do women need to take special precautions to prevent a stroke?

DEAR DOCTOR K: Do women need to take special precautions to prevent a stroke?

DEAR READER: Yes, they do -- and a new set of guidelines published earlier this year helps us to understand what those steps should be. The guidelines discuss stroke risk factors that women should consider from adolescence to old age. The first thing that may be surprising about the guidelines is that they include stroke prevention advice for young women.

How is vaginal dryness treated?

DEAR DOCTOR K: I've been bothered by vaginal dryness. Sex is painful. My doctor believes it's vaginal atrophy due to menopause. Can you tell me more about this condition? How is it treated?

DEAR READER: During a woman's reproductive years, the lining of the vagina is kept moist and lubricated in part by female hormones made by the ovaries -- particularly estrogen. With the start of menopause, estrogen levels decline. This often leads to vaginal atrophy: The lining of the vagina becomes thin and dry.

Which type of birth control is right for me?

DEAR DOCTOR K: I've recently become sexually active and I'm planning to go on the pill. But there are so many different types of birth control pills. Which one is right for me?

DEAR READER: I don't know enough about you to give an answer that's right for you. From my general remarks about these pills, I'm hopeful you can pinpoint the ones that seem right for you -- and discuss them with your doctor.

My doctor recommended Monistat for my strong “fishy” vaginal odor but that hasn’t helped. What can I do?

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have a strong "fishy" vaginal odor and a little discharge. My doctor recommended Monistat, but that hasn't helped. What can I do?

DEAR READER: Miconazole (Monistat) is an antifungal medication. It treats vaginal yeast infections, which are caused by a fungus. If Monistat didn't work, you most likely don't have a yeast infection. Instead, you probably have bacterial vaginosis (BV).

How do I talk to my teenager about sex?

DEAR DOCTOR K: I'm the parent of a teenage girl. I know it's time to talk to her about sex, and I'd appreciate any advice.

DEAR READER: Many parents feel anxious or uncomfortable talking with their children about sex. But remember that if you don't, somebody else will. Teens get lots of information (and misinformation) about sex from their friends, the Internet, television, magazines, books and movies. It's up to you to make your child understand what it really means to have sex, both physically and emotionally.

Does having dense breast tissue increase my risk of breast cancer?

DEAR DOCTOR K: After my last mammogram, the doctor told me I have dense breasts. Does this increase my risk of breast cancer?

DEAR READER: A woman's breast contains different types of tissue, including fat. Women with dense breasts have relatively less fat in their breasts. Specifically, if more than 50 percent of your breasts is made up of other breast tissue (as opposed to fat), then by definition you are said to have "dense breasts." It's not uncommon: About 40 percent of women have dense breasts.